Sunday, February 5, 2023

What is the dosage of anti-blood clot medicine? Information found in this research

The risk of blood clots increases significantly in people who are severely infected with corona. Incidents like heart attack and brain stroke are happening due to blood clotting.

Heart attack can come due to blood clot

Image Credit source: EverydayHealth.com

Download Link

corona patients to thin the blood in anti-coagulants Dose is required, but it was able to work properly as to how much dose is required. Now this information has been found in a research. Studies have found that an intermediate-level dose has an 86 percent chance of working better than a low-dose anti-coagulant. With this dose, the blood can be saved from thickening.

The risk of blood clots increases significantly in people who are severely infected with corona. Incidents like heart attack and brain stroke are happening due to blood clots. Doctors are giving blood thinners to people who are having blood clots. But the most effective and safest dose for this was never determined. The Australian COVID-19 Trial (ASCOT) study has identified the best use of a drug to thin the blood of patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

This research has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine and was presented at the American Society for Hematology conference. The ASCOT team conducted this trial to test different levels of anti-coagulation (or blood thinners) in over 1,500 patients in Australia, New Zealand, India and Nepal (between February 2021 and March 2022).

This dose of T-coagulation is better

Dr. Vivekananda Jha, executive director of the George Institute for Global Health, says more studies need to be done to establish the safety and efficacy of anti-coagulants in Covid. Our findings show that an intermediate level of anti-coagulation was 86 percent more likely to work better than a low-dose anti-coagulation.

International guidelines recommend higher doses

The fact that the intermediate dose was better means that patients with it were more likely to survive. Importantly, however, this approach will save more lives in the future when it becomes part of Indian guidelines and routine practice for the treatment of hospitalized but non-critically ill adults. The trial is particularly relevant to India as 1,273 of the 1,526 people were admitted to Indian hospitals.

ASCOT Principal Investigator Professor Steven Tong, Royal Melbourne, said the current practice in Australia is for low doses of anti-coagulation, while international guidelines recommend high-level doses of anti-coagulation. Therefore, our findings provide evidence that a middle ground may be most beneficial.

latest health news read here

spot_imgspot_img
spot_img

Hot Topics

Related Articles